fuckyeahfluiddynamics

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Bouncing a ball partially filled with a liquid can create chaotic results when the motion of the ball, fluid, and vibration plate couple. The behavior of a grain-filled ball is a bit different, though. Large grains will tend to bounce with the same frequency as the ball, even across a range of vibration conditions. A ball filled with smaller grains displays a variety of responses depending on the vibration conditions. Among these is a localized wave-like form called an oscillon which oscillates with a period different from but coupled to that of the vibration plate. All these different behaviors inside the bouncing sphere have noticeable effects on its outward motion, too. The chaotic activity of the fluid inside a bouncing ball makes it unstable, and, if not confined, it will bounce itself off the vibration platform. The grain-filled ball, on the other hand, remains bouncing on the platform even after being perturbed. This seems to be a result of the energy dissipation provided by the many inelastic collisions inside the ball as it bounces. (Video credit: F. Pacheco-Vazquez et al.)

jtotheizzoe
jtotheizzoe:

sagansense:


Here are a compilation of recordings made in space, recorded by either NASA or SETI. I don’t know, I just really like space and the sounds can be soothing. I hope that you will agree. +more masterposts 
+listenRecordings Of Earth: Recorded by NASA.Jupiter sound waves: This is the sound Jupiter emits via electromagnetic waves.Wow! signal: The Wow! Signal is a signal of unknown origin found by SETI. The signal surpirsed the founder so much, he wrote WOW! right on the paper.Jupiter’s radio Waves: These sounds, recorded by the Cassini space probe, are recordings of the radio waves of Jupiter. Saturn’s Radio Emissions: This audio was recorded by the Cassini spacecraft picked up in April of 2002.More Saturn’s Radio Emissions: This audio was recorded by the Cassini spacecraft picked up in April of 2002.Uranus: Voyager recording of Uranus.Mercury: These sounds were captured from an orbiting satellite from back in 1999 - 2001 I think.Pluto: Sounds of the lonely planet.Neptune: Recorded by Voyager II August 24-25, 1989.Saturn’s rings: Recorded by Voyager 2 on 25 August 1981.Sounds of the Sun: From the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) which was launched February 11, 2010.Outside the Solar System: NASA’s Voyager 1 spacecraft captured these sounds of interstellar space. November 2012
+bonusThe Sounds of Earth: The full five hours of the mixtape we sent out on both the Voyager probes.Voyager Photo Album: Images voyager took.USS Enterprise (NCC-1701-D): Engine hum for 24 hours.

#WSW2014

There may not be sound IN space, but that doesn’t mean we don’t make a whole lot of cool ones FROM it.
One of my very first OKTBS YouTube videos was about space sounds. It features some not listed above, tune in here:

jtotheizzoe:

sagansense:

Here are a compilation of recordings made in space, recorded by either NASA or SETI. I don’t know, I just really like space and the sounds can be soothing. I hope that you will agree. +more masterposts 

+listen
Recordings Of Earth: Recorded by NASA.
Jupiter sound waves: This is the sound Jupiter emits via electromagnetic waves.
Wow! signal: The Wow! Signal is a signal of unknown origin found by SETI. The signal surpirsed the founder so much, he wrote WOW! right on the paper.
Jupiter’s radio Waves: These sounds, recorded by the Cassini space probe, are recordings of the radio waves of Jupiter. 
Saturn’s Radio Emissions: This audio was recorded by the Cassini spacecraft picked up in April of 2002.
More Saturn’s Radio Emissions: This audio was recorded by the Cassini spacecraft picked up in April of 2002.
Uranus: Voyager recording of Uranus.
Mercury: These sounds were captured from an orbiting satellite from back in 1999 - 2001 I think.
Pluto: Sounds of the lonely planet.
Neptune: Recorded by Voyager II August 24-25, 1989.
Saturn’s rings: Recorded by Voyager 2 on 25 August 1981.
Sounds of the Sun: From the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) which was launched February 11, 2010.
Outside the Solar System: NASA’s Voyager 1 spacecraft captured these sounds of interstellar space. November 2012

+bonus
The Sounds of Earth: The full five hours of the mixtape we sent out on both the Voyager probes.
Voyager Photo Album: Images voyager took.
USS Enterprise (NCC-1701-D): Engine hum for 24 hours.

#WSW2014

There may not be sound IN space, but that doesn’t mean we don’t make a whole lot of cool ones FROM it.

One of my very first OKTBS YouTube videos was about space sounds. It features some not listed above, tune in here:

fuckyeahfluiddynamics
fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Designer Eleanor Lutz used high-speed video of five different flying species to create this graphic illustrating the curves swept out in their wingbeats. The curves are constructed from 15 points per wingbeat and are intended more as art than science, but they’re a fantastic visualization of several important concepts in flapping flight. For example, note the directionality of the curves as a whole. If you imagine a vector perpendicular to the wing curves, you’ll notice that the bat, goose, and dragonfly would all have vectors pointing forward and slightly upward. In contrast, the moth and hummingbird would have vectors pointing almost entirely upward. This is because the moth and hummingbird are hovering, so their wing strokes are oriented so that the force produced balances their weight. The bat, goose, and dragonfly are all engaged in forward flight, so the aerodynamic force they generate is directed to counter their weight and to provide thrust. (Image credit: E. Lutz; via io9)

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Designer Eleanor Lutz used high-speed video of five different flying species to create this graphic illustrating the curves swept out in their wingbeats. The curves are constructed from 15 points per wingbeat and are intended more as art than science, but they’re a fantastic visualization of several important concepts in flapping flight. For example, note the directionality of the curves as a whole. If you imagine a vector perpendicular to the wing curves, you’ll notice that the bat, goose, and dragonfly would all have vectors pointing forward and slightly upward. In contrast, the moth and hummingbird would have vectors pointing almost entirely upward. This is because the moth and hummingbird are hovering, so their wing strokes are oriented so that the force produced balances their weight. The bat, goose, and dragonfly are all engaged in forward flight, so the aerodynamic force they generate is directed to counter their weight and to provide thrust. (Image credit: E. Lutz; via io9)

asapscience
tehnakki:

mindblowingscience:

Next Generation Spacesuit like Second Skin

Scientists from MIT have designed a next-generation spacesuit that acts practically as a second skin, and could revolutionize the way future astronauts travel into space. (Photo : Jose-Luis Olivares/MIT)
Astronauts are used to climbing into conventional bulky, gas-pressurized spacesuits, but this new design could allow them to travel in style. Soon they may don a lightweight, skintight and stretchy garment lined with tiny, muscle-like coils. Essentially the new suit acts like a giant piece of shrink-wrap, in which the coils contract and tighten when plugged into a power supply, thereby creating a “second skin.”
"With conventional spacesuits, you’re essentially in a balloon of gas that’s providing you with the necessary one-third of an atmosphere [of pressure,] to keep you alive in the vacuum of space," lead researcher Dava Newman, a professor of aeronautics and astronautics and engineering systems at MIT, said in astatement.
"We want to achieve that same pressurization, but through mechanical counterpressure - applying the pressure directly to the skin, thus avoiding the gas pressure altogether. We combine passive elastics with active materials. … Ultimately, the big advantage is mobility, and a very lightweight suit for planetary exploration."
Newman, who has worked for the past decade on a design for the next-generation spacesuit, describes the new garment in detail in the journal IEEE/ASME: Transactions on Mechatronics.
The MIT BioSuit’s coils, which are a main feature of the outfit, are made from a shape-memory alloy (SMA). At a certain temperature, the material can “remember” and spring back to its engineered shape after being bent or misshapen.
Skintight suits are not a novel idea, but in the past scientists have always struggled with the question: how do you get in and out of a suit that is so tight? That’s where the SMAs come in, allowing the suit to contract only when heated, and subsequently stretched back to a looser shape when cooled.
Though the lightweight suit may not seem at first like it can withstand the harsh environment that is outer space, Newman and his colleagues are sure that the BioSuit would not only give astronauts much more freedom during planetary exploration, but it would also fully support these space explorers.
Newman and his team are not only working on how to keep the suit tight for long periods of time, but also believe their design could be applied to other attires, such as athletic wear or military uniforms.
"An integrated suit is exciting to think about to enhance human performance," Newman added. "We’re trying to keep our astronauts alive, safe, and mobile, but these designs are not just for use in space."


Scuse you, Dava Newman is a FEMALE professor at MIT. 

(fyi, I passed out in a vacuum chamber wearing an earlier version of this suit. =D)

tehnakki:

mindblowingscience:

Next Generation Spacesuit like Second Skin

Scientists from MIT have designed a next-generation spacesuit that acts practically as a second skin, and could revolutionize the way future astronauts travel into space. (Photo : Jose-Luis Olivares/MIT)

Astronauts are used to climbing into conventional bulky, gas-pressurized spacesuits, but this new design could allow them to travel in style. Soon they may don a lightweight, skintight and stretchy garment lined with tiny, muscle-like coils. Essentially the new suit acts like a giant piece of shrink-wrap, in which the coils contract and tighten when plugged into a power supply, thereby creating a “second skin.”

"With conventional spacesuits, you’re essentially in a balloon of gas that’s providing you with the necessary one-third of an atmosphere [of pressure,] to keep you alive in the vacuum of space," lead researcher Dava Newman, a professor of aeronautics and astronautics and engineering systems at MIT, said in astatement.

"We want to achieve that same pressurization, but through mechanical counterpressure - applying the pressure directly to the skin, thus avoiding the gas pressure altogether. We combine passive elastics with active materials. … Ultimately, the big advantage is mobility, and a very lightweight suit for planetary exploration."

Newman, who has worked for the past decade on a design for the next-generation spacesuit, describes the new garment in detail in the journal IEEE/ASME: Transactions on Mechatronics.

The MIT BioSuit’s coils, which are a main feature of the outfit, are made from a shape-memory alloy (SMA). At a certain temperature, the material can “remember” and spring back to its engineered shape after being bent or misshapen.

Skintight suits are not a novel idea, but in the past scientists have always struggled with the question: how do you get in and out of a suit that is so tight? That’s where the SMAs come in, allowing the suit to contract only when heated, and subsequently stretched back to a looser shape when cooled.

Though the lightweight suit may not seem at first like it can withstand the harsh environment that is outer space, Newman and his colleagues are sure that the BioSuit would not only give astronauts much more freedom during planetary exploration, but it would also fully support these space explorers.

Newman and his team are not only working on how to keep the suit tight for long periods of time, but also believe their design could be applied to other attires, such as athletic wear or military uniforms.

"An integrated suit is exciting to think about to enhance human performance," Newman added. "We’re trying to keep our astronauts alive, safe, and mobile, but these designs are not just for use in space."

Scuse you, Dava Newman is a FEMALE professor at MIT. 

(fyi, I passed out in a vacuum chamber wearing an earlier version of this suit. =D)